August12014
11AM

stirringwind:

yes, all the daily showers, deodorants and antiseptic handwashes ubiquitous to the developed world weren’t always so :D The queen who bathed only twice referred to by Iran and Spain is Spanish Queen Isabel I :P

European civilisations like Rome and Greece were pretty clean- they had lots of public baths and a sophisticated plumbing system to pump water to houses. But from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, there was a mistaken belief that bathing too much was unhealthy and left one susceptible to the various plagues sweeping Europe, such as the bubonic plague (aka Black Death). Alas, they had zero idea of the germ theory. Also, there was some Christian interpretations that bathing too much was kind of worldly. Renaissance Europe did have bath houses, but at that time, they were seen as centres of moral degeneration because prostitution took place there, total nudity while bathing became frowned upon, and women in general were discouraged from visiting them. By contrast, the Asian civilisations were a lot cleaner for various reasons. 

In Ottoman Turkey and Safavid Persia/Iran washing oneself was very integral to Islamic ritual. This would have been the case for Mughal India, which was Islamic too- and anyway, Hinduism also placed emphasis on cleanliness. Japan and China have always had a long history of bath houses, (also hot springs in the case of Japan). In China, it was thought that taking in the waters was good. Turkey’s last comment is a reference to how the idea of Turkish bath houses would eventually become popular in Victorian England :P

(via kelbora)

July312014
11AM
July302014

luciseaux:

germannn:

Funny and bizarre German animal names
The German language is famous for some really long nouns (Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän comes to mind). This is because German nouns, verbs, prepositions and adjectives are like lego bricks; you can stick them together in almost any way to create new words that encapsulate new concepts. This gives the language a special ability to name just about anything. You could call it the German language’s lego brick-like quality, or Legosteineigenschaft (see what I just did there?).

But why does German rely on such an elaborate process to name things as simple as squirrels? When broken down into their separate components, the names of familiar animals mutate into bizarre new creatures.

The Uncanny X-Tiere

Comics are full of heroes with names like super, wonder, iron, ultra, bat or cat followed by -man, -woman, -girl or -boy. A lot of German animal names work the same way, where Tier – the word for animal – is preceded by a word describing that animal’s “super power”.

  • Stinktier – stink animal (skunk)

  • Faultier – lazy animal (sloth)

  • Gürteltier – belt animal (armadillo)

  • Murmeltier – mumbling animal (groundhog)

  • Schnabeltier – beak animal (platypus)

  • Maultier – mouth animal (mule)

  • Trampeltier – trampling animal (bactrian camel). The verb trampeln means to trample or tread upon, whereas the noun Trampel is a clumsy oaf.

Sometimes suffixes get more specific than -tier, but still tend to describe the wrong animal:

  • Schildkröte – shield toad (tortoise)

  • Waschbär – wash bear (raccoon)

  • Nacktschnecke – naked snail (slug)

  • Fledermaus – flutter mouse (bat)

  • Seehund – sea dog (seal)

  • Tintenfisch – ink fish (squid)

  • Truthahn – threatening chicken (turkey). Trut is onomatopoeic for the trut-trut-trut cluck of a turkey, but it’s also been hypothesized that the name comes from the Middle German droten which means “to threaten”.

No, I’m Pretty Sure That’s A Pig

Swine seem to be a popular yardstick in German animal taxonomy.

  • Schweinswal – pig whale (porpoise)

  • Seeschwein – sea pig (dugong). Not to be confused with the Seekuh, or sea cow, known in English as a manatee.

  • Stachelschwein – spike pig (porcupine). The English word is actually just as literal; porcupine sounds a lot like “pork spine”.

  • Wasserschwein – water pig (capybara)

  • Meerschweinchen – ocean piglet (guinea pig). The ending -chen denotes something small. Add it to the end of Schwein and you get a little pig, or piglet. Since the stems Meer and Wasser are often interchangeable, it’s most likely that Meerschweinchen actually means little capybara.

Just Plain Weird

I’d like to end this list by giving one animal a category all to itself: the humble squirrel.

Eichhörnchen:

  • little oak horn: Eiche (oak tree) + Horn (horn) + -chen (little)
  • oak croissant: Eiche (oak tree) + Hörnchen (croissant)

alternate names:

  • Eichkätzchen (regional name) and Eichkatzerl (Austria) – oak kitten

Calling a squirrel a “tree kitten” is reasonably literal, but where does “little oak horn” come from? It seems that the answer comes down to a misplaced h: Eichhörnchen comes from the Old and Middle German eichorn, which has nothing to do with oak trees or horns. In this case, the eich comes from the ancient Indo-Germanic word aig, which means agitated movement, combined with the now obsolete suffix -orn. Somewhere in history a superfluous h was added (along with the diminutive -chen ending) but the original meaning remained. Today, Hörnchen is a category of rodents that includes all squirrels, chipmunks, groundhogs, prairie dogs and flying squirrels.

Keep an eye on this spot for an upcoming post where we’ll delve deeper into the animal kingdom: branching out to birds, insects, reptiles, fishes and any other mammals we find crawling around.

German language is absolutely adorable (and occasionally predictable).

11AM
July292014
nerdy-pumpkin:

promarkers on board (actually sketched IN THE AIRPORT. what an inspiration for cabin pressure pic whoah)

nerdy-pumpkin:

promarkers on board (actually sketched IN THE AIRPORT. what an inspiration for cabin pressure pic whoah)

(via fractionallyfoxtrot)

11AM
July282014
sully-s:

So near the end of WWII Canada liberated  the Randstad,  (four largest Dutch cities Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) from German occupation. Which allowed Canada to send food aid to the many of dutch citzens who where suffering from the Hongerwinter (‘Hungerwinter’). The Netherlands were so thankful   for Canada’s help that they send Canada ten thousand tulips every year since the war which started the  Canadian Tulip Festival.

sully-s:

So near the end of WWII Canada liberated  the Randstad,  (four largest Dutch cities Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht) from German occupation. Which allowed Canada to send food aid to the many of dutch citzens who where suffering from the Hongerwinter (‘Hungerwinter’). The Netherlands were so thankful   for Canada’s help that they send Canada ten thousand tulips every year since the war which started the  Canadian Tulip Festival.

11AM

bumbleshark:

well-written novel sized fanfiction

image

(via deedeex333)

July272014
saerok:

some ppl call me the space cowboyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

saerok:

some ppl call me the space cowboyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

(via deedeex333)

11AM
sully-s:

I like to think that Japan and America assign each other characters to cosplay and both try to out do the other.   

sully-s:

I like to think that Japan and America assign each other characters to cosplay and both try to out do the other.   

July262014
the-wrong-turn:

My contribution to the tenth anniversary of Danny Phantom! I can at least dream of a reboot.Done in flash.

the-wrong-turn:

My contribution to the tenth anniversary of Danny Phantom! I can at least dream of a reboot.
Done in flash.

(via fishandfoxes)

11AM
July252014

My Friend Death - Chapter 9 Update

Normally unit cohesion occurs among a group of like-minded individuals. Alfred finds out that this is not really the case for all those against the occupiers.

Read the update here: https://www.fanfiction.net/s/10391168/9/My-Friend-Death

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